Farm News (09/09/14)

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Important Reminders:
  • This week we are delivering vegetables, fruit, eggs, and dairy.
  • Next week we will be delivering vegetables and fruit.

The Vegetable Share:

  • Arugula
  • Yellow or Red Potatoes
  • Leeks
  • Tomatoes (probably heirloom)
  • Fresh Thyme & Oregano
  • Shallots
  • Red & Green Head Lettuce
  • Kohlrabi
  • Napa cabbage or Traditional Cabbage
  • Eggplant or Cantaloupe
The Fruit Share:
  • Bartlett Pears
  • Raspberries
  • Nectarines
  • 'Jupiter' Grapes
This week's fruit share is a colorful collection of late summer and early fall fruits. The peach has wrapped up for the season, and we're distributing the last of the nectarines this week. The coming weeks will keep Mick's crew busy harvesting grapes, raspberries, apples, pears, and plums. He will also be making a batch of cider later this month that we will distribute in one of the final fruit shares.


 The Dairy Share:
  • Greek Yogurt from Pastureland Cooperative
  • 'Sweet Constantine' from Hook's Cheese Co. (similar to an aged Asiago)
  • Handmade Cultured Butter with Sea Salt from Nordic Creamery

In the Farm Kitchen: Tips for Making the Most of your Share
Bartlett pears are a favorite in the farm kitchen because they are such a delicious and versatile fruit. They can be used in sweet desserts as well as in savory meat dishes and vegetable salads. Your pears are picked on the firm side in order to prevent bruising during harvest. Store them in the fridge until a few days before you want to eat them. Then allow them to ripen at room temperature. Placing pears in a paper bag at this point will speed things up because it traps the ethylene gas that pears naturally emit during the ripening process.



The shallot is considered by some cooks to be the most glamorous member of the onion family. It is a kitchen staple in France where it is prized for its complex onion flavor. It is strong without being sharp. Store shallots in a dry place out of direct sunlight. They will keep for several months.


  

This Week's Featured Recipes

Vegetable Frittata
from Bon Appétit, September 1997

1 1/2 teaspoons olive oil
2 shallots, thinly sliced
1 medium bunch arugula, chopped
1 cup fresh tomatoes, chopped
4 large eggs
6 large egg whites
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/2 cup grated Asiago cheese

Preheat broiler. Heat olive oil in 10-inch-diameter nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add shallot; sauté until golden. Add arugula and tomatoes; stir until arugula is wilted, about 1 minute.

Whisk eggs, egg whites, salt and pepper in medium bowl to blend. Pour egg mixture over vegetables in skillet; stir gently to combine. Reduce heat to medium-low. Cook without stirring until eggs are set on bottom, about 5 minutes. Sprinkle cheese over frittata. Broil until cheese melts, about 2 minutes.                     
 
Potato Gratin with Leeks & Thyme
from www.williams-sonoma.com

2 tablespoons olive oil
2 leeks, halved lengthwise, white and light
  green parts thinly sliced

1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme
1 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
1 1/2 pounds potatoes, cut into 1/8-inch-thick rounds 
1 1/2 cups chicken broth
Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Set a 1-quart baking dish on the sheet.
In a sauté pan over medium heat, heat the olive oil. Add the leeks, thyme, salt and pepper and cook, stirring occasionally, until softened, about 6 minutes. Transfer to a large bowl, add the potatoes and toss to combine. Transfer the potato mixture to the baking dish, lightly pressing down on the potatoes. Pour the broth over the top.

Transfer to the oven and bake until the potatoes are tender and the tops are golden brown, about 40 minutes. Let cool for 10 minutes before serving.

Herbed Italian Bread
4 to 6 tablespoons butter at room temperature
1 teaspoon chopped fresh oregano
1/2 cup freshly grated Asiago or Parmesan cheese
24-inch French or Italian bread , split lengthwise

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In a small bowl combine butter, herbs and cheese. Stir to combine. Spread evenly over cut sides of bread. Wrap bread in aluminum foil. Bake until warm all the way through and cheese melts, about 15 minutes. Unwrap and slice. Serve immediately.

Arugula and Pear Salad
2 tablespoons finely chopped shallots
4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
1/2 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1/4 teaspoon salt
Freshly ground pepper, to taste
1/2 cup chopped walnuts
3 small firm Bartlett pears
5 cups head lettuce torn into bite-size pieces
4 cups chopped arugula

Whisk shallot, oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper in a small bowl. Toast walnuts in a small dry skillet over medium-low heat, stirring, until fragrant, 2 to 3 minutes. Transfer to a small bowl and let cool.

Just before serving, cut pears into thin slices. Place in a large bowl. Spoon on 1 tablespoon of the dressing and toss to coat. Add lettuce, arugula and the remaining dressing; toss well. Divide among plates. Top with the walnuts.
 
Cabbage, Potato & Leek Soup
from The New York Times, March 9, 2012

6 tablespoons butter
2 medium leeks, white and light green parts, thinly sliced
8 cups shredded cabbage
2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
3 medium potatoes, peeled and diced
2 cups chicken or vegetable stock
2 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
2 thyme branches
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
grated asiago or parmesan cheese for serving
Melt the butter in a large pot over medium-high heat, add the leeks and cook until soft and golden around the edges, 5 to 7 minutes. Add the cabbage and garlic and cook, stirring occasionally, until cabbage begins to caramelize, about 10 minutes.
Stir in potatoes, stock, 4 cups water, salt and thyme. Bring soup to a simmer and cook, partly covered, until potatoes begin to fall apart, 45 to 50 minutes. Add more water, as needed, to reach the desired consistency. Season with black pepper and serve, topped with cheese.
 
Next week's harvest (our best guess)... spinach, winter squash, tomatoes, lettuce, green onions, garlic, carrots, apples, raspberries, radishes, broccoli, kale, and more!

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  • Margaret Sheaffer